Claire and Jamie share a kiss after 20 years apart.

The Not-Sunday Seven for Outlander 306

The long-awaited, highly anticipated “print shop scene” episode has arrived!  You knew there would be disappointment in the crowd.  After all, everyone has a favorite moment they want to see brought to life, and you can’t possibly recreate everyone’s moment, let alone portray it exactly as they had in mind.  Fortunately for me, I didn’t have any particular notions or desires, so I wasn’t terribly disappointed.  I, too, had read Voyager with great anticipation for Jamie and Claire’s reunion, and was thrilled to experience it, but… eh, we’ll get to that later.   So let’s discuss

A. Malcolm, Episode 306

1.   It’s a special episode

Just in case you didn’t realize it was a “special episode,: we got an extra 15 minutes as a reward for waiting two weeks.  Then we got a cold open (the first ever of the series) that depicts a day, or at least a morning, in the life of Jamie Fraser Alexander Malcolm, Printer & Bookseller.  And its title card boasts a special conceit with the writer and director coming hot off the presses.

Outlander's episode 306 title card was printed on an 18th century printer.

Clever or conceit? Or clever conceit? (Photo © Entertainment Weekly)

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Murtagh Fitzgibbons Fraser begins his journey to the Colonies.

A Sunday Seven of Outlander Podcasts

The problem with being a procrastinator is (obviously) putting things off until the very last minute.  This sometimes leads to skipping things altogether, at least when they’re not essential.  In this last week’s Sunday Seven case, it was a combination of getting sidetracked and not coming up with any ideas.  But I promised to blog throughout the entire Outlander season and finally thought of something Outlander related, so here goes.

Podcasts (and a Vlog) I Enjoy—to Varying Degrees

In reverse order (i.e., from least to most enjoyed):

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Claire and Brianna talk while walking around Harvard.

Outlander 305’s Sunday-on-Saturday Seven

Last week’s post mentioned the ever-increasing fabulousness of each Outlander episode would likely come to an end.  It did.   But we can still count and discuss…

Freedom and Whiskey, Episode 305

1.  It was better than expected

Faint praise for sure.  After all, it featured my least favorite character, while my most favorite character was nowhere to be seen.  (Well, he was likely at Helwater with his new wife and adopted child.)  But this episode sufficiently held my attention upon first viewing so as not to seem to drag.  Nonetheless, I have little desire to watch it again or  listen to any of its podcasts, and no desire to discuss it on message boards.

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Jamie hugs Willie.

Outlander 304’s (Sunday) Seven Thoughts

Season 3 of Outlander just keeps getting better and better.  Episode 301 was great; episode 302, better; episode 303, even better, possibly the best; episode 304, possibly the best, with a couple of exceptions. Unfortunately, the streak likely ends here.  The second half of Voyager isn’t nearly as compelling as the first half, falling into some pretty terrible tropes.  Plus, there’s no more Lord John Grey (for a while).

Lord John Grey mourns the departure of his beloved Jamie Fraser.

I, too, am sad Lord John Grey will be leaving us for a while.

And now on to…

Of Lost Things, Episode 304

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Sunday Seven for Outlander 303

[Note:  I had this post finished several days ago, but forgot to publish it by Saturday.]

Outlander covered quite a bit of ground this week, literally, figuratively, and temporally.    Ten years passed for Claire, Frank, and Brianna.  Claire graduated from medical school, Bree from high school, and Frank went to the movies with his mistress.  Only four years (or thereabouts) went by in the eighteenth century, but they were an eventful four-ish years.

Did the episode meet my hopeful expectations?  Absofreakintlutely.  So, let’s discuss

All Debts Paid, Episode 303

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Sunday Seven’s Saturday Edition of Outlander 302

Written by the wonderful Anne Kenney, “Surrender” was everything one could hope for.  And more.  Well, maybe not everything if you were looking for an exact repetition of the book, or took exception to the brown tam not hiding the red hair, or whatever other nitpick you had.  Yeah, this is just my opinion, but it bothers me when people can’t enjoy the forest because there’s one tree they’re unhappy with.  Then again, I want everyone to like everything.

I will miss you next season, Anne!  Your scripts are wonderful.   So here are my thoughts for

 Surrender, Episode 302

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Outlander Is Back! And I Have Thoughts.

Seven of them!

In an effort to try to become somewhat disciplined with my writing, I’m reinstating my Sunday Seven.  And what better way than to discuss Outlander?  Sure, my posts will be a  week late.  But that’s okay.  By this time, all the reviews have been written, the podcasts & vlogs have been published, and discussion of the episode has died down.  What better way to get ready for the latest episode than to refresh our memories of the last episode?

Well, crap!  I forgot that Starz loads the episodes early OnDemand, so I’m already late.  Maybe we’ll make this a “Saturday Seven” in the future.

This is not a list of favorite moments.  Well, some are favorites, others are simply observations, some of which I’ve not seen elsewhere.  On to the thoughts for

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Spring, er Winter Cleaning

It’s time to revamp and reorganize the blog. The Skeptical theme served me well for a couple years (especially since it was literally picked at random via a random number generator).  But a renewed interest has me itching to post pictures and the old theme was too narrow for what I’d like to do.

That renewed interest is knitting, brought by my current love affair with Outlander.  And since we’re in the middle of a prolonged cold spell, it’s not too late to make some chunky cowls and arm warmers.  Look for some project photos and knitting thoughts coming soon.  As well as some additional blog housekeeping.

I'm making a pair of "garter stitch mitts" by Ysolda from Ravelry.

Almost finished: Ysolanda’s garter stitch mitts.

Throwback Thursday

#tbt:  Apparently it’s quite The Thing on Twitter.  I’ve been thinking about reblogging some of my posts from The (Old) Stream of Conscience, and “Throw Back Thursday” seems as good a day as any, yes?

When deciding what post to reblog, I took a look at my 34 categories.  How to choose?  Why, my old favorite, of course, Random.org.  (I also used it to pick the style for this blog.)  It spewed out 14, which turned out to be the ubiquitous “Life & Musings,” i.e., pretty much any damn thing.  Since the blog covered 5½ years, there were 9 pages of posts to peruse; yet, the one I chose was on the first page.

It was written on December 8, 2012, in response to WordPress.com’s Daily Post challenge, which asked “What is your earliest memory?  Describe it in detail, and tell us why you think that experience was the one to stick with you.”  Mine was easy-peasy.  (I’ve edited only slightly.)

My Earliest Trauma Memory

And how appropriate for the season!

A two-and-a-half year-old me entertains Christmas visitors.

Entertaining visitors; permanent crisis averted

Harken back to a slower, quieter time: the mid-20th century, an age without digital cameras, when it took a few months to fill up a roll of film and get it developed.

Christmas day:  One 2½-year-old went to bed the night before, thinking of Santa Claus on his rounds, and worried she wouldn’t be able to sleep for all the excitement.

But I did fall asleep, which made the night pass more quickly.

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What’s in a Minute?

One-Minute Organizer set of books is written by Donna Smallin.

One-Minute Organizer (Plain & Simple edition)

While waiting for an appointment yesterday, I came upon an interesting book called One-Minute Organizer Plain & Simple by Danna Smallin.  Leafing through it, I found some excellent quick tips for cleaning out clutter and getting my home (and life) in order.  I attempted to capture its wisdom with my tablet, first by taking pictures of the pertinent pages.  When that proved horrendously cumbersome, I tried to jot down notes on my tablet, only slightly less horrendously cumbersome.  I would have used the old tried-and-true pen-to-paper method, but had no paper.

After mentioning the book to my therapist (the appointment), she told me to take it with me.  So I did—with the intention of returning it after I’ve reaped its beneits.

The book is much like Don’t Sweat the Small Stuff and other inspirational books, with little tidbits of help on every page.

The first chapter is titled “Getting Started.”  It discusses the importance of goals, consistency, accountability, and rewards.   For me, one tip stands out from all the others:  take care of today’s mess.  Tackle those chores that need to be done regularly, such as the daily mail, dishes, and laundry.  To those, I would add email and paying bills.

That tip was a light-bulb moment.  My to-do lists have always been about “keeping up” and never about “moving forward.”  Just that one sentence has changed my thinking.  Now I can separate those things I need to do every day from those things that will help me reach my goals.

I’ve addressed today’s mess, having cleaned and put away the dishes, folded and put away the laundry, and dealt with the mail.  Tomorrow, the goals!